Browsing All Posts filed under »PHYS 2110 (1 Calc)«

Interactive tool: How does a function releate to its Derivative and Integral (PhET / UC Boulder)

August 26, 2010 by

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Interactive tool for showing how derivatives and integrals relate to a graph of a function. Really great for experimenting with the meaning of basic calculus ideas. Intuitive and graphical. Spend a little time playing to see where the derivative is zero, positive, negative, or how the integral grows. Draw a graph of any function and see graphs of its derivative and integral. Don't forget to use the magnify/demagnify controls on the y-axis to adjust the scale.

Fact sheet: The Scale of things

August 24, 2010 by

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Well organized graphic showing how large and small numbers are used to describe the real world. Shows pictures of objects along side of the order of magnitude of their sizes. Good for getting a feel for how the numbers are used and for making these small and large sizes comprehensible.

Downloadable simulation: Inertia of a ball on a wagon (Mathematica)

August 24, 2010 by

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Downloadable simulation showing inertia in action. A simple demo, but it nails the point home. This Demonstration depicts a simple experiment, in which a small car with an object on top hits an obstacle, and the object continues its motion in the same direction and with the same speed

Downloadable simulation: Annotated quadratic polynomial (Mathematica)

August 23, 2010 by

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Downloadable simulation that lets you see how a second degree polynomial (aka, quadratic) changes shape when you change the coefficients. Get a good feel for how the graph changes. This Demonstration will also let you see where the zeros of the polynomial are. Good experience for constant acceleration problems. The zero is when a body in free fall, say, crosses the origin of your coordinate system.

Downloadable simulation: Quadratic practice (Mathematica)

August 23, 2010 by

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Downloadable simulation that lets you get a feel for how a second degree polynomial (aka, quadratic) changes shape when you fiddle with its coefficients. Adjust the coefficients of the parabola to hit all of the dots. Then, click the button to get a new set of dots. Good for constant acceleration problems, since distance vs. time is a quadratic for this situation.

Downloadable simulation: Spinning out sine and cosine (Mathematica)

August 23, 2010 by

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Downloadable simulation of how the sine and cosine functions are made from rotation through a circle. Get a feel for how trig functions relate to coordinates and lengths. Imagine a point that starts at and rotates counterclockwise on the unit circle. If is the length (in radians) of the arc on the circle between and the point, then as the point moves around the circle its and coordinates are the cosine and sine of .

Downloadable simulation: Vector addition (Mathematica)

August 23, 2010 by

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Downloadable simulation of how two vectors add using arrows and using components. This Demonstration illustrates head-to-toe addition of vectors in the coordinate plane. Initial and terminal ends of the vectors can be located in an [-8, 8] by [-8, 8] window.